Author Archives: Sarah Sclater

Miriam Shepphard

Miriam has exhibited widely around the Bath and Wells area and I am delighted that she has agreed to exhibit work this year with Art at Home. In her own words ….

I wish to capture the atmosphere of landscape and sky as I see and feel it. To me, this subject offers an endless source of inspiration. By removing references to humans or animals, my focus is on the land, the sky and the interaction between them. The transient nature of the sky and the effect it has on the land.

Of course, few landscapes are free of human influence – the fields are ploughed, planted, harvested and the hedges create boundaries. However, skies continuously change; clouds form, disperse and reform, the light either direct or indirect moves on the land. The moments before a storm, a sunset or a foggy morning have very different atmospheres and it is this diversity that I find endlessly fascinating.

My paintings all start as simple sketches, from observation. I then develop various studies before starting on what I hope to be finished paintings. Working this way allows me to really explore a subject and if it really appeals I often work on a series based on a theme.

Corinna Pyman

Corinna was taught to throw by George Farkas in London in 1999. He instilled a respect for thrown forms which still informs the shapes of the bowls and cups which she makes today- essentially that the user should be “invited in”, and by extension the whole object should be a pleasure to hold and to touch.

Corinna often mixes her own glazes and the idea is that the glaze becomes the decorative interest of the piece, sometimes alone and sometimes in concert with  other glazes, either overlapping or slip-trailed into swirls on a wheel.   She often uses coloured slips under both white and transparent glazes to provide a stronger colour; but the glazes are never “flat”- even white on its own has minute speckles which appear as part of the firing process.

Michelle McCullagh

Michelle is a Dorset born artist whose love of animals and nature has influenced her work from a young age. A talented horsewomen her understanding of an animals physiology is clear. Trained at Falmouth School of Art,Michelle has travelled widely and now lives in the Welsh mountains where the wild landscape is giving her work a new and exciting dimension.

Jason Anderson

Jason works from his home studio on the Dorset coast in Poole. Trained as a stained glass practitioner his work reflects a keen interest in colour and his strong brush strokes show a deep understanding of how a strong palette can transform the canvas. He is an exciting new find and I am tremendously pleased to be the first gallery to show his work.

Judy Thompson

Judy work is humorous, vibrant and her brushwork wonderfully free.  A busy mother, grandmother and businesswoman in her own right,  Judy’s painting reflects her good humour and love for life – while incorporating her travels and unique vision of the landscapes around her.

Liz Somerville

I am hugely exhibited at hLiz has agreed to exhibit with Art at Home – Her work is highly  respected and  has interested me for many years.

Liz graduated from Winchester School of Art in 1988 with a degree in Textile Design. In London she freelanced for print design agents whilst continuing to develop her paintings and prints.

She moved to Dorset in 2004 to concentrate on her printmaking and painting, and has taken part in numerous open studios and group exhibitions since. Inspired by Ravilious, Nash and Bawden, her imagery concentrates on landscape and the incidental forms and structures found within it.

Walking forms a major part of Liz’s work and life. She does most of it in winter, a perfect time to see a landscape, really see it; it’s bare bones, hard contours, un-obscured structures and un-adorned trees. Once back in the studio she draws what she’s seen, using sketches, photos and memory. These drawings form the backbone to her linocuts. From them she is able to really define her subject before refining and translating into a linocut.

She combines relief print with painting which allows her to re-work a single image many times, changing its appearance in each case. She works in a studio attached to her house in a small village in the heart of west Dorset.